For many of us, by this time each year we have well and truly settled back into the routine of work. Hopefully you are feeling great – you are finding your work meaningful, are filled with a sense of purpose and have clarity about the difference you are making in the world.

But what if you are not? What if you find yourself slipping back into old ways of thinking about work? What if this year is already turning into same old, same old? If this is you…

It’s time to disrupt your thinking.

22

Disrupt the Status Quo

You may be unaware of many your beliefs about work and how important your beliefs are. You may have repeated these thoughts so often, they are now outside of your conscious awareness. Let’s play with this. Imaging thinking is like a game. Once you know the rules of the game, you can disrupt your thinking by changing the rules. You don’t have to be stuck with your old beliefs and thinking styles about work. You can interrupt them, disrupt them, challenge them and finally change them.

Kay’s Story:

Kay, a Director within a large organisation, had, what she considered, (and knew deep down) an unhelpful belief:

‘My staff annoy me’.

Kay believed her staff had the power to drive her crazy. She is not alone. I recently asked 150 people if they believed people can ‘drive them crazy’.  An incredible 87% of respondent said yes! Kay didn’t know she could change her thinking about how she felt about her staff. She was waiting for THEM to change.

‘But that IS my reality. They DO annoy me’.

Kay knew believe this was not helping her be the leader she wanted to be. She also understood that by choosing to believe this, she was looking for evidence to confirm that ‘My staff annoy me’. She thought she was stuck with her current beliefs. She decided to disrupt them by changing them. She tried on a few different ways of thinking about her staff and finally decided on:

‘Sometimes, some of my staff behave in ways that I choose to feel annoyed about’.

This new belief resulted in her being in a more empowered state to choose how she responded when she was leading her staff.

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